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How much is the price of the dollar today in Peru? Exchange rate for October 5


Find out how the dollar will open today.  - Andina Credit
Find out how the dollar will open today. – Andina Credit

Check the dollar price today Thursday October 5th. Yesterday the Central Reserve Bank announced the closure of the exchange rate at S/3.8130. Thus, the US currency was slightly lower with respect to the value at which it closed in the previous session.

Meanwhile, in the parallel market the dollar price It is priced at S/3.80 for the purchase and S/3.82 for the sale, according to the portal quantitativeesteldólar.pe.

This is how the dollar closed in the BCR.  - Capture Credit of the Central Reserve Bank
This is how the dollar closed in the BCR. – Capture Credit of the Central Reserve Bank

He exchange rate opened at S/3.82180 on the economic portal Bloomberg.

This is how the dollar opened today in Peru.  - Bloomberg Capture Credit
This is how the dollar opened today in Peru. – Bloomberg Capture Credit

Despite the political crisis that Peru is currently experiencing and against all odds, the economy of this country boasts of being a of the most stable of the Latin American region, because while other currencies have experienced fluctuations, the peruvian sun has been strengthened.

The coronavirus pandemic generated a series of negative economic effects worldwide – such as inflation – which, also combined with Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and local monetary policy decisions, have been weakening the dollar.

However, the Peruvian currency has shown resilience to these events and has strengthened against the greenback and the euro. If the positive factors that have supported the sun in recent months continue, the currency could continue with the same streak in the coming months and even years.

Archive photo.  A worker walks past the logo of the Central Reserve Bank of Peru (BCRP) inside its headquarters building in Lima, Peru, June 16, 2017. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo
Archive photo. A worker walks past the logo of the Central Reserve Bank of Peru (BCRP) inside its headquarters building in Lima, Peru, June 16, 2017. REUTERS/Mariana Bazo

The resistance of the Peruvian sol in the face of other adversities that have managed to hit other currencies has made it become a “shelter currency”especially in countries where dollars have been scarce, as is the case of Bolivia.

Although economic analysts have reduced their growth expectations for the Peruvian sol for the next two years, however, it is expected that macroeconomic balances will continue to support the sun.

The sol has been legal tender in Peru since 1991 and replaced intiwhich circulated between 1985 and 1991, was initially also called as “new Sun” to differentiate it from its predecessor, but in 2015 it is called only the sun.

The origin of the new sun is understood after the world crisis of 1929, which led to a deep economic and exchange crisis in the country, as well as the creation of the Central Reserve Bank of Peru. It was during the first year of Alberto Fujimori’s government that the new sun was promoted to balance the hyperinflation and reorganize the economy.

After it came into effect, one sol was equivalent to one million intis or one billion “old” sols; Today the currency is divided into 100 cents and its issuance is regulated by the Central Reserve Bank of Peru.

Currently circulating coins of 10, 20, 50 cents, 1, 2 and 5 soles and bills of 10, 20, 50, 100 and 200 soles. Previously, 1 cent coins were also minted, but these were withdrawn from circulation in May 2011, while in January 2019 the 5 cent coins went out of circulation.



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